Category Archives: geometrical

A minus times a minus is a plus -Are you sure you know why?

What exactly are negative numbers?
A reference , from Wikipedia:
In A.D. 1759, Francis Maseres, an English mathematician, wrote that negative numbers “darken the very whole doctrines of the equations and make dark of the things which are in their nature excessively obvious and simple”.
He came to the conclusion that negative numbers were nonsensical.[25]

A minus times a minus is a plus
Two minuses make a plus
Dividing by a negative, especially a negative fraction !!!!
(10 – 2) x (7 – 3) = 10 x 7 – 2 x 7 + 10 x -3 + 2 x 3, really? How do we know?
Or we use “the area model”, or some hand waving with the number line.

It’s time for some clear thinking about this stuff.

Mathematically speaking, the only place that requires troublesome calculations with negative numbers is in algebra, either in evaluation or in rearrangement, but what about the real world ?
Where in the real world does one encounter negative x negative ?
I found two situations, in electricity and in mechanics:

1: “volts x amps = watts”, as it it popularly remembered really means “voltage drop x current flowing = power”
It is sensible to choose a measurement system (scale) for each of these so that a current flowing from a higher to a lower potential point is treated as positive, as is the voltage drop.

Part of simple circuit A———–[resistors etc in here]————–B
Choosing point A, at potential a, as the reference, and point B, at potential b, as the “other” point, then the potential drop from A to B is a – b
If b<a then a current flows from A to B, and its value is positive, just as a – b is positive
If b>a then a current flows from B to A, and its value is negative, just as a – b is negative

In each case the formula for power, voltage drop x current flowing = power, must yield an unsigned number, as negative power is a nonsense. Power is an “amount”.
So when dealing with reality minus times minus is plus (in this case nosign at all).

The mechanics example is about the formula “force times distance = work done”
You can fill in the details.

Now let’s do multiplication on the number line, or to be more precise, two number lines:
Draw two number lines, different directions, starting together at the zero. The scales do not have to be the same.
To multiply 2 by three (3 times 2):
1: Draw a line from the 1 on line A to the 2 on line B
2: Draw a line from the 3 on line A parallel to the first line.
3: It meets line B at the point 6
4: Done: 3 times 2 is 6
numberlines mult pospos
Number line A holds the multipliers, number line B holds the numbers being multiplied.

To multiply a negative number by a positive number we need a pair of signed number lines, crossing at their zero points.

So to multiply -2 by 3 (3 times -2) we do the same as above, but the number being multiplied is now -2, so 1 on line A is joined to -2 on line B

numberlines mult posneg
The diagram below is for -2 times 3. Wow, it ends in the same place.
numberlines mult posneg

Finally, and you can see where this is going, we do -2 times -3.

Join the 1 on line A to the -3 on line B, and then the parallel to this line passing through the -2 on line A:

numberlines mult negneg

and as hoped for, this line passes through the point 6 on the number line B.

Does this “prove” the general case? Only in the proverbial sense. The reason is that we do not have a proper definition of signed numbers. (There is one).

Incidentally, the numbering on the scales above is very poor. The positive numbers are NOT NOT NOT the same things as the unsigned numbers 1, 1.986, 234.5 etc

Each of them should have a + in front, but mathematicians are Lazy. More on this another day.

Problem for you: Show that (a-b)(c-d) = ac – bc – ad + bd without using anything to do with “negative numbers”

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References.
Wikipedia:
Reference direction for current
Since the current in a wire or component can flow in either direction, when a variable I is defined to represent
that current, the direction representing positive current must be specified, usually by an arrow on the circuit
schematic diagram. This is called the reference direction of current I. If the current flows in the opposite
direction, the variable I has a negative value.

Yahoo Answers: Reference direction for potential difference
Best Answer: Potential difference can be negative. It depends on which direction you measure the voltage – e.g.
which way round you connect a voltmeter. (if this is the best answer, I hate to think of what the worst answer is)
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Filed under algebra, arithmetic, definitions, education, geometrical, math, meaning, negative numbers, Number systems, operations, subtraction, teaching, Uncategorized

Linear transformations, geometrically

 

Following a recent blog post relating a transformation of points on a line to points on another line to the graph of the equation relating the input and output I thought it would be interesting to explore the linear and affine mappings of a plane to itself from a geometrical construction perspective.

It was ! (To me anyway)

These linear mappings  (rigid and not so rigid motions) are usually  approached in descriptive and manipulative  ways, but always very specifically. I wanted to go directly from the transformation as equations directly to the transformation as geometry.

Taking an example, (x,y) maps to (X,Y) with the linear equations

X = x + y + 1 and Y = -0.5x +y

it was necessary to construct a point on the x axis with the value of X, and likewise a point on the y axis with the value of Y. The transformed (x,y) is then the point (X,Y) on the plane.

The construction below shows the points and lines needed to establish the point(X,0), which is G in the picture, starting with the point D as the (x,y)

 

transform of x

The corresponding construction was done for Y, and the resulting point (X,Y) is point J. Point D was then forced to lie on a line, the sloping blue line, and as it is moved along the line the transformed point J moves on another line

gif for lin affine trans1

Now the (x,y) point (B in the picture below, don’t ask why!) is forced to move on the blue circle. What does the transformed point do? It moves on an ellipse, whose size and orientation are determined by the actual transformation. At this point matrix methods become very handy.(though the 2D matrix methods cannot deal with translations)

gif for lin affine trans2

All this was constructed with my geometrical construction program (APP if you like) called GEOSTRUCT and available as a free web based application from

http://www.mathcomesalive.com/geostruct/geostructforbrowser1.html

The program produces a listing of all the actions requested, and these are listed below for this application:

Line bb moved to pass through Point A
New line cc created, through points B and C
New Point D
New line dd created, through Point D, at right angles to Line aa
New line ee created, through Point D, at right angles to Line bb
New line ff created, through Point D, parallel to Line cc
New point E created as the intersection of Line ff and Line aa
New line gg created, through Point E, at right angles to Line aa
New line hh created, through Point B, at right angles to Line bb
New point F created as the intersection of Line hh and Line gg
New line ii created, through Point F, parallel to Line cc
New point G created as the intersection of Line ii and Line aa

G is the X coordinate, from X = x + y + 1 (added by me)

New line jj created, through Point G, at right angles to Line aa
New line kk created, through Point D, at right angles to Line cc
New point H created as the intersection of Line kk and Line bb
New point I created, as midpoint of points H and B
New line ll created, through Point I, at right angles to Line bb
New point J created as the intersection of Line ll and Line jj

J is the Y coordinate, from Y = -x/2 + y  (added by me)
and K is the transformed point (X,Y) Point J chosen as the tracking point (added by me)

New Line mm
Point D moved and placed on Line mm

 

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Filed under algebra, conics, construction, geometrical, geometry app, geostruct, math, ordered pairs, rigid motion, teaching, transformations, Uncategorized

Mathematics in my garden

So there it was, built from one clothesline to another, glistening in the sunlight one morning last week:

spiderweb

A near perfect spiderweb, demanding a better photo:
spiderweb2

Here is  the horizontal strip, showing the variation in spacing of the spiral:
spiderweb2partonly

and again, with a superimposed scale. The spider is at the centre.spiderweb cropped with dots

And now rotated, to give more detail.spiderweb cropped with dots rotated

Now “Get modelling!”.

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Filed under algebra, geometrical, Puerto Rico, series, teaching, tropical garden, Uncategorized

Halving a triangle, follow-up number two, pursuing the hyperbola

Halving the triangle, any triangle, led to the equation XY = 2 as the condition on the points on two sides of the triangle, distant X and Y from the vertex.
The envelope of this set of lines turned out to be a hyperbola.
But XY = 2 defines a hyperbola – what is the connection ?

I took xy = 1 for the condition, on a standard xy grid, and wrote it as representing a function x —-> y, namely y = 1/x
The two points of interest are then (x,0) on the x-axis and (0,1/x) on the y-axis.
We need the equation of the line joining these two points, so first of all we have to see that our x, above, is telling us which line we are talking about, and so it is a parameter for the line.
We had better give it a different name, say p.
Now we can find the equation of the line in x,y form, using (p,0) and (0,1/p) for the two points:
(y – 0)/(1/p – 0) = (x – p)/(0 – p)
which is easier to read as yp = -x/p + 1, and easier to process as yp2 = -x + p

Now comes the fun bit !
To find the envelope of a set of straight lines we have to find the points of intersection of adjacent lines (really? adjacent?). To do this we have to find the partial derivative (derivative treating almost everything as constant) of the line equation with respect to the parameter p. A later post will reveal all about this mystifying procedure).
So do it and get  2yp = 1

And then eliminate p from the two equations, the line one and the derived one:
From the derived equation we get p = 1/(2y), so substituting in the line equation gives 1 = 2xy
This is the equation of the envelope, and written in functional form it is
y = 1/(2x), or (1/2)(1/x)
Yes ! Another rectangular hyperbola, with the same asymptotes.
(write it as xy = 1/2 if you like)

Now I thought “What will this process do with y = x2 ?”
So off I go, and to cut a long story short I found the following:
For y = x2 the envelope was y = (-1/4)x2, also a multiple of the original, with factor -1/4
parabola by axa track point
parabola by axa track point and line

Some surprise at this point, so I did it for 1/x2 and for x3
Similar results: Same function, with different factors.
Try it yourself ! ! ! ! ! ! !

This was too much ! No stopping ! Must find the general case ! (y = xk)
Skipping the now familiar details (left to the reader, in time honoured fashion) I found the following:

Original equation: y = xk

Equation of envelope: y = xk multiplied by -(k-1)k-1/kk

which I did think was quite neat.
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The next post will be the last follow-up to the triangle halving.

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Constructions made with GEOSTRUCT, an online browser application:

To get geostruct from the net click
http://www.mathcomesalive.com/geostruct/geostructforbrowser1.html

and to download the .doc instructions file
http://www.mathcomesalive.com/geostruct/geostruct basics.doc

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Filed under algebra, calculus, construction, envelope, geometrical

Halving a triangle, follow-up number one, ellipse

The previous post is “Analytic (coordinate) geometry has its good points, but elegance is not one of them”, in which a formula for any line cutting a triangle in half was found. The envelope of the cutting line for one section (of three) of the triangle was found to be always a hyperbola, which got me thinking “How do I get an ellipse?”. Clearly not by cutting a triangle in half, which involved taking two points A’ and B’on adjacent sides of the triangle, and making the product of their distances from the point of intersection of the sides equal to half the product of the lengths of the two sides.

So we cannot take two distances along two lines from the same point, lets try two distances from separate points on two lines, and keep the product of the distances constant. Magic:
envelope ellipse cropped
The base line is AF. Line DL is set parallel to AF. B and G are the two points of interest, where AB and DG are the two distances, and the envelope of the line BG is an ellipse which touches AF and DL. The really interesting thing about this is that the lines do not have to be parallel, and that as the points A and F are placed nearer and nearer to the point of intersection the ellipse becomes more and more hyperbolic at the nearby end.

The next post will be a different follow-up to the triangle halving.

Constructions made with GEOSTRUCT, an online browser application:

To get geostruct from the net click
http://www.mathcomesalive.com/geostruct/geostructforbrowser1.html

and to download the .doc instructions file
http://www.mathcomesalive.com/geostruct/geostruct basics.doc

 

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Filed under conic sections, construction, geometrical